Meet Miracle Izuchukwu, 24-year-old Nigerian Who Is America’s Youngest Licensed Black Female Commercial Pilot

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The story of Miracle Izuchukwu is about doggedness and sheer passion for a targeted goal having started as an airport customer service representative before becoming a flight attendant.

Beautiful Miracle in an interview granted a US based Nigeria Standard Newspaper said;
“Flying is freedom. It’s a lifetime opportunity. I finally found a career that I love. Growing up, I had no idea what I wanted to do. I would watch a lot of TED Talks, thinking about a career I would love. Becoming a pilot is a fulfilment, I can do this job all day. I want young girls to see me in my pilot uniform and tell them they can also become pilots. Preparing the next generation of black girls that want to become a pilot is my top priority.”

A Naturalized American who made history as the youngest licensed black female commercial pilot in the United States of America. Though grew up in New York but broke the gas ceilings recently when she became the youngest woman of color to be a black female commercial pilot in the United States of America.

Narrating her story, she started working as an airport customer service representative before becoming a flight attendant. She met a pilot that instilled in her the passion to become a pilot.

“I later told my parents that I wanted to be a pilot. At first, my parents didn’t support my dream. They didn’t see it as a possibility. My dad told me that if a black woman were flying a plane, he would get off the plane. My mom was totally against it. My mom is a nurse and wanted me to follow in her footsteps. My mom felt that to survive in the United States, I needed to be a nurse to put food on the table. Being a nurse was not my passion.

“I’m the eldest of five children. In the African culture, the oldest sibling is responsible for caring for their siblings. My parents said that there was no way I could leave my siblings behind. My mom tried to stop me at all costs, but seeing my persistence, she eventually caved in.

“When I left for Ohio, I wondered if I had made the right decision. When I left home, I decided there was no going back. I had to prove to my parents that I would be successful. Not only did I need their support, but I also needed them financially. I had to find a way to support myself to enroll in the pilot program. I found a way by taking out student loans. I succeeded, and my parents are very proud of me.” Miracle narrated her story boastfully.

How does she feel like to be a young female in an industry that is dominated by white men?

“It feels great. I’m very thankful for the aviators that came before me to have the opportunity to pursue my dreams.
“I need 1,500 flight hours to work for an airline. As of now, I have 300 flight hours. The training is very intense. I have been keeping myself motivated because I know that I will reach my goal of getting 1,500 flight hours. It’s an opportunity of a lifetime. I finally found a career that I love. Growing up, I had no idea what I wanted to do. I would watch a lot of TED Talks, thinking about a career I would love. Becoming a pilot, I can do this job all day.”

Miracle Izuchukwu said it has become her paramount dream to see Bessie Coleman.
“She is the reason why I am a pilot. I would ask her what gave her the courage to become a pilot and people who doubted her being a black female pilot. I can relate to her because I went through obstacles to become a pilot as Bessie Coleman did.”


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